EV options grow in coming years

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2023

Audi E-tron: Audi’s first BEV went on sale in the U.S. in early 2019, and its limited range disappointed. Audi took steps this year to improve range through software and packaging changes. A sportback version went on sale this year, as well. The crossover will be due for a freshening in 2023, when its range is likely to be expanded further, among other changes.

BMW X8: An all-new two-row crossover, described as a sporty version of the X7, is expected in late 2022. A plug-in hybrid delivering more than 750 hp could arrive the next year.

Buick electric large SUV: Buick is likely to build a large electric SUV in late 2023. It could be built at GM’s Ramos Arizpe plant in Mexico, which is expected to be retooled to build EVs in the next few years.

Buick electric midsize crossover: In 2023, forecasters say, Buick plans to launch a midsize electric crossover that will be about the size of the redesigned Envision. It will likely be built in Orion Township, Mich., alongside the Chevrolet Bolt EV and upcoming Bolt utility vehicle.

Cadillac Celestiq: The high-performance, ultraluxury sedan, expected to go on sale in 2023, will be hand built in low volumes at the GM Tech Center in Warren, Mich., at a rate of 1.2 vehicles per day. Cadillac is dubbing the Celestiq its flagship EV.

Cadillac large electric SUV: In 2023, Cadillac is expected to launch an electric SUV similar in size to the Escalade. The SUV will be built at Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly and could be an electric version of the Escalade or a new nameplate.

Chevrolet electric pickup: GM has teased an electric full-size pickup that will be built at Detroit-Hamtramck, likely in 2023. The pickup could be an electric Silverado or a new nameplate. GM said it will have more than 400 miles of range on a single charge.

Ford/Lincoln electric midsize crossovers: Ford plans to replace the Edge with an electric midsize crossover in 2023. The vehicle, code-named CDX746, now is expected to be built in Cuautitlan, Mexico, the same plant that will build the Mustang Mach-E. Ford previously said the vehicle would be made in Flat Rock, Mich., before reverting to its original plans for Mexico. There will be a Lincoln version, as well.

GMC Hummer electric SUV: GMC is planning an off-road-capable SUV version of the Hummer electric pickup, also to be built at Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly, likely in 2023.

Honda EVs: Honda is co-developing two electric vehicles with GM based on a GM platform and using GM’s new Ultium batteries. Honda will design the EVs, which are likely to be crossovers. Sales are expected for the 2024 model year, so the models are likely to appear in 2023, if the original timeline holds.

Jaguar EV-Type: Jaguar reportedly is considering two possible successors to the F-Type: a midengine gasoline model or a battery-electric sports car. Reports out of England say Jaguar has trademarked the name EV-Type in case the electric version is chosen. It could arrive in 2023.

Land Rover Discovery Sport: During a reengineering of the awd midsize crossover in 2023, the mild-hybrid powertrain could be upgraded to a plug-in version.

Maserati Levante: Maserati’s first crossover could get a mild hybrid version in 2021 and a battery-electric offering around 2023.

Maserati Quattroporte: The Quattroporte will be redesigned in 2023. A battery-electric version could come around then, as well.

Mercedes-Benz C-Class: After a redesign in the first half of 2022, a plug-in hybrid variant could arrive in 2023, offering up to 62 miles of electric-only range, based on European emissions tests.

Nissan Leaf: Nissan launched a longer-range version of the Leaf early last year, powered by a 62-kWh battery pack that delivers 226 miles on a full charge. The Leaf should get a redesign in the first half of 2023. The next-gen model could be built on a new EV platform shared by Nissan’s alliance partners, Renault and Mitsubishi.

Porsche 911: Porsche is expected to freshen the 911 in the second quarter of 2023 and could introduce a plug-in hybrid variant that year. The hybrid is said to be inspired by the technology used in the 918 Spyder and 911 GT3 R hybrid race car. It will have a shorter ZF eight-speed dual-clutch transmission to make space for an electric motor without the need to expand the powertrain footprint. The batteries will be mounted in the front of the vehicle to help with weight distribution.

Tesla compact vehicle: Musk has discussed adding a compact vehicle that could handle tight roads in European cities, even suggesting it be engineered in Germany. He has said the vehicle could be priced around $25,000 and last month said it could launch in about three years.

Toyota Prius/Prius Prime: Executives at Toyota Motor North America are taking long looks at the Prius’ declining sales, seeing some customers getting poached by Tesla and others moving into one of Toyota’s other now-prevalent hybrid offerings. If the Prius and plug-in Prius Prime version stay — and Toyota is normally loath to give up any segment, let alone one it created — they could undergo one more freshening in 2023, given Toyota product cycles.

Toyota-Subaru battery-electric crossover: Not much is known about the EV fruits of a partnership between Subaru and Toyota, but the two brands will share one platform. It’ll be a new nameplate rather than a battery-powered variant of an existing model and will be about the size of a Forester. It might be offered in a front-wheel-drive variant with one motor and an awd layout with two motors. The timing of its arrival has been unclear from the automakers except that it’ll be in the first half of the 2020s. For this list, we’ll estimate it’s about three years away.

Volkswagen ID Buzz: The retro-styled homage to the venerated Microbus of yore is finally due to arrive in the U.S. in 2023, some five years after the concept was shown. The Buzz concept remains popular, and Volkswagen has announced plans to overhaul its plant in Hamburg, Germany, to begin producing it.

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Saurabh Shukla

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